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   Family & Lifestyle

 WINTER ISSUE 2004  SUBSCRIBE


Star Power
Be proud of your Jewish identity without abandoning your sense of fashion when you wear this seed pearl and Swarovski crystal necklace with a sterling silver Magen David (Star of David) pendant ($52 plus shipping, handling and insurance).


Potato Pancakes for the Time-Challenged
This Hanukkah, bypass the peeling, grating and scraped knuckles with Ruthie and Gussie's Traditional Potato (Latke) Pancake Batter ($14.75 for 28-ounce refreezable container, about 20 latkes).


A Flair for Flavor
Ever dreamed of owning a place in the country where you could escape the frenetic pace, overcrowding, crime and grime of city life?


Why We Do the Things We Do
Q: Why do many people light menorahs in the front windows of their homes?
Susan Isaacs

In the mid-1970s, Susan Isaacs was a busy wife and mother-but not in the traditional sense. She was also a senior editor at Seventeen magazine, a political speechwriter and a freelance journalist. Isaacs eventually decided to leave the magazine world and stay home with her two small children, only to start her first novel barely a year later. The rest, as they say, is history.

Isaacs's tenth novelAnyplace I Hang My Hat, about a twenty-something political reporter searching for her estranged mother-was published in October.



Steeped in Strength

Being resilient in the face of adversity is something Jewish women know a lot about.


Going to the Dogs at Hanukkah

Don't forget the dog lovers (and their canine cronies) when you're doing your Hanukkah gift shopping.


Identity Cards

Forget bridge and poker. 52 Activities for Jewish Holidays ($6.95), the new set of cards by Lynn Gordon and Nina Miller, offers a winning hand of a different sort.


Menorahs of Many Colors

Glorious strands of color run through Joseph's Coat Menorah ($180 plus S&H), by artist Tamara Baskin.


Seasonal Reading for Kids

Jennifer is different in a way no one can see: She is the only Jewish student in her first-grade class, which is making Christmas decorations.


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